Door 24: Nothing

We hope you liked this year's edition of our Christmas calendar, but after 23 entries, we do not want to distract you any further. This is why our entry
features nothing. Enjoy your holidays with your family and friends. Merry Christmas you all of you!

Your GRUNDTNER & SöHNE Team

View more

Door 23: Daniel Johnston

The impact an artist has on one's personal life is often re-assessed, when the artist unfortunately passes away. Our calendar already featured the recently deceased architect Juliaan Lampens, but also in other arts like important people died, like the the musician David Berman from The Silver Jews. Another significant musician, who died in 2019 was the American singer-songwriter Daniel Johnston.

It is interesting to see how many people Daniel Johnston touched with his music, most of the time simply recorded on tape alone in his house. Born in California in 1961, he grew up in West Virginia. From an early age, he showed an interest in arts, especially drawing and music. After graduating high school and dropping out of colleges, he followed his brother and moved to Austin, Texas.

Here he made a name for himself handing out his recordings on tape, while working at  McDonald's. As Austin's New Sincerity music scene attracted quite some media interest, he was featured in a 1985 episode of the MTV program The Cutting Edge. He recorded his most known album 1990 with producer Mark Kramer in 1988 in New York. During this period his mental illness got in his way and generally deteriorated at the end of the 1980s.

He got known to an even lager public as Kurt Cobain wore a T-Shirt with his design for the album Hi, how are you? at the MTV Awards in 1992. During 1990s his conditions changed constantly, but still produced music to low commercial success.

In the last fifteen years, the interest in his work grew again, especially after Jeff Feuerzeig’s 2005 documentary The Devil And Daniel Johnston, which gives an honest and in-depth look at his life. Still musically active, he also released a comic book in 2012 and died this year in September of a heart attack.

View more

Door 22: Margot & Fergus Henderson

Photography © Todd Selby

If one thinks of British cuisine, either international cuisine form the former commonwealth springs to mind or bad, tasteless food, about the latter not only Asterix & Obelix make fun of. Despite this cliche, London's culinary scene is pulsating as ever and it is to a large due to the work of husband and wife chef duo Fergus and Margot Henderson.

Margot is originally from New Zealand, but they met while Fergus, who was born and raised in London, was chef at the Eagle. After marrying, they opened in 1992 the French House Dining Room at the French House pub in Soho, London. Simple, but delicious food, that can be served in a pub, is in a way still core to their cooking.

Then Fergus left in 1994 to open together with his partners Trevor Gulliver and Jon Spiteri the infamous St. John's restaurant on St. John Street, where he became the head-chef. His take on traditional British food and his philosophy of nose to tail cooking, which included pieces of meat like pigs' ears, ducks' hearts, trotters, pigs' tails, bone marrow and squirrel. This also led to a series of cookbooks, which cemented his reputation. Despite being diagnosed with Parkinson in 1998, he is still active.

After having three kids, Margot together with Melanie Arnold, who replaced Fergus on the business side of things, founded Rochelle Canteen in 2000. The restaurant is in a converted bicycle shed in the courtyard of a former Victorian school in Shoreditch. The un-fuzzy environment is reflected in the food, which changes daily and is dependent on the season. Additionally to its location in east London, they specialize in catering for openings or weddings and recently in 2017 a second branch at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in London.

View more

Door 21: Playlist

Photography © Ergin Erteber for collection no2

Proudly we present you our entry number 21. It is a playlist curated by Innere Tueren, who released one of our favorite albums this year on Kann. The playlist carries the title I Thought This Was The End, Then It Started Over and comprises ten tracks. The mix starts slowly with spoken words and soundscapes and builds up the tension gradually, but stylistically staying true to Innere Tueren a.k.a. Things from the Basement's signature taste.

It is our second collaboration with Innere Tueren, real name Ergin Erteber. Back in 2015 he already created a beautiful playlist for us entitled I'll be your mirror. This one was less dancefloor oriented and more for a pensive mood, but still relevant today. The mix was accompanied by an artwork, which hangs in our store.

View more

Door 20: T-Shirt

Already the 20th of December, this means time for our last Christmas special this year. It is another T-Shirt, this time with a holiday themed digital print. Same as the first T-Shirt, it is based on Airbag Craftworks' basic T-Shirt. The shirt features a comfortable wide round neckline and is made in Europe.

Out T-Shirt is presented with S.N.S. Herning's classic Naval knit in a beautiful shade of blue entitled architecture blueNorse Projects' Thomas Wool Trousers in navy, and Howlin's beautifully brushed wool hat in a bright and sunny yellow.

View more

Door 19: Alexandra Bircken

Photography: Wolfgang Tillmans Courtesy © Galerie Buchholz, Köln, Berlin

That fashion and art have a close relationship is an open secret. Designers seek inspiration in art and artists are drawn to particular designers. Another crossover are the countless collaborations of brands with artists, but there are designers, who leave fashion behind to become artists. Best known from a fashion side is Helmut Lang, but also the German artist Alexandra Bircken started as fashion designer.

Photography © Raimund Zakowski

She was born in 1967 in Cologne and studied fashion design at the infamous Central Saint Martins College in London, graduating with bachelor of arts in 1995. Her graduation collection got quite some interest and so she founded the fashion label FARIDI together with Alexander Faridi, which was sold at stores like Liberty and Browns. From 2002 until 2004 she had a shop and studio in Cologne called ALEX.

Due to her teachings at Central Saint Martins and her work as a freelance designer, she had financial independence and was able to experiment with her work. She described her shift from fashion to art as a gradual process and not as a conscious decision. Fashion was her initiation as, for her, the body is always the starting point. This also why the various human shells like skin and attire are at the core of her work.

Lop Lop, 2019, Courtesy of the artist, BQ, Berlin & Herald St., London, Photography: Sophie Thun

Another key theme of her work is cutting objects to reveal their inner life. She does so with objects like motorcycles or guns. Concerning the latter she that it not only reveals their inner lives, but also deactivates them. Since 2018 also lives and works in Berlin and Munich, at the later she teaches at the Akademie der bildenden Künste München.

View more

Door 18: Record Culture Magazine

Print was declared dead long time ago and unfortunately it is proven right. Especially music magazines folded in recent years like important and long running imprints Spex or Groove Magazine. But at the same time print became stronger in niches, which can be explained through a shift of focus, like Apartamento did for interior magazines.

In a similar vein, but musically focused, is the magazine Record Culture Magazine. As the title suggests, it is more about the culture regarding records, music and its connection to fashion and art. It was founded in 2016 by Karl Henkell, an Australian, born to German parents and raised in Melbourne. This inherited world-spanning view is also the approach to the artists chosen for the magazine.

Michel Gaubert from Issue 7

With the magazine, he wants to "document niche music communities around the world and their intersection with art, fashion and culture". The magazines does so by allowing in-depth interviews accompanied by editorials that show the artists in their natural environment not staged or styled photoshoots. So far the magazine featured among others Lena Wilikens, Lovefingers, Laraajj, Marie Davidson and in the latest issue Michel Gaubert.

Henkell also tries to shine  a light on people that would not get the attention in mainstream media. Additionally he wants to emphasize the importance of community through the magazine. It is released twice a year and is at the moment at issue 7.

View more

Door 17: Armando Ruinelli

Photography © Marcello Mariana

We have a big soft spot for architecture that blends in, uses existing structures to create something new. Said so, one tends to rather think of urban structures, like Arno Brandlhuber does, but that this can also be the case in rural areas, without being dated or pseudo-traditional, shows the Swiss architect Armando Ruinelli.

Born in 1954 in Soglio close to the Italian border, he left his hometown aged 16 to do an apprenticeship as a construction engineer in Zürich. Despite all of his colleagues, he decided not to continue his studies but rather come back to his hometown to find out what he wants. In Graubünden, the area of his hometown, there was no architectural association, so you did not need an academic degree to become an architect, so step by step he became an architect.

Studio Ruinelli, Soglio, 1988, Armando Ruinelli © Ralph Feiner

He opened his own practice in Soglio in 1982 and started with smaller projects like drawings for a cemetery wall or a hut and in 1988 his own studio, which he considers his first proper own project. This already was a blueprint for his working practice, especially his use of local topography and untreated materials, that change with age, which others would avoid.

He sees his work as a dialogue between the contemporary and tradition and thereby avoiding the pseudo-traditional style that is so dominant in the Alps. Another key factor for him is craftsmanship, which for him is an essential tool in his practice. Here he also combines the traditional techniques with new expertise. Still active today, he won several times the Häuser AWARD and Best Architects Award and despite not having a degree in architecture teaches regularly at various schools, all over Europe.

Casa RM - © Ruinelli Associati

View more

Door 16: Lost in La Mancha

When presented with the final work of a design, an artwork or a movie, one rarely questions the process, difficulties or the possibility of failure, that went into making this piece. Most likely there were some and it is interesting to see the struggle along the way. The 2002 documentary Lost in La Mancha by Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe beautifully does that.

It did not set out to document failure, their intention was rather, after filming the making-of process of Terry Gilliam's 12 Monkeys, entitled The Hamster Factor and Other Tales of Twelve Monkeys, to film another making of. Terry Gilliam's plan was to make a film loosely based on Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote and change it slightly into Mark Twain's novel A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. He worked on the film from 1989 and after securing funding started shooting in 2000.

Johnny Depp, as a lead role, should play a 21st century marketing executive, who through time travel meets Don Quixote, initially played by Jean Rochefort, who mistakengly thinks he is Sancho Pancho. The struggles, they had on set, besides overrunning the budget, were that they were filming in Spain near a NATO base, so constantly aircrafts flew over the set. Gilliam thought he could redo this in post-production, but then on the second day of shooting a flood and flash hail destroyed some of the set, where some scenes were not finished. Additionally Jean Rochefort was diagnosed with a herniated disc, which made it impossible for him to ride a horse. This led to the end of the production and only the documentary was released.

After further attempts and legal problems, the film was finally released in 2018 with a new cast featuring Adam Driver, Jonathan Pryce, Olga Kurylenko in the leading roles. Additionally Fulton and Pepe were following this process as well and will be releasing another documentary entitled He Dreamed of Giants in the near future.

View more

Door 15: Overshirt

Our third special this year is a beautiful overshirt in crisp white. The shirt is made from a sturdy and durable cotton fabric. It features a slightly pointy collar, two side pockets, a single inner pocket and a hidden button line. Additionally it has a pink leather patch on the left chest, which can be used as a pencil holder.

Our overshirt is presented with Éditions M.R Classic Sweatshirt in refreshing pink, Airbag Craftworks' long sleeve shirt NSOF with a print by Andrew Lyster, a bubble knit Merino hat by Norse Projects and Matthew Miller's Leto trousers in a thick Kvadrat wool fabric.

View more

1 2 3 13 Next »